Lark Ascending: The Music of the British Landscape

£8.99

‘The Lark Ascending’, Ralph Vaughan Williams’ ‘pastoral romance for orchestra’ was premiered on 14th June, 1921. Over the course of the 20th century this piece of music, perhaps more than any other, worked its way into the collective consciousness to seemingly define a mythical concept of the English countryside: babbling brooks, skylarks, hayricks. But the birth and legacy of the composition are much more complex than this simplified pastoral vision suggests. On a chronological journey that takes him from postwar poets and artists to the late 20th century and the free party scene which emerged from acid house and travelling communities, Richard King explores how Britain’s history and identity has been shaped by the mysterious relationship between music and nature.

In stock

Description

* A Rough Trade, Mojo and Evening Standard Book of the Year *

‘Peerless cultural history.’ Ian Thomson, Evening Standard

‘Original.’ Guardian

‘Fascinating.’ Mail On Sunday

‘Exceptional.’ Irish Times

Over the course of the twentieth century, The Lark Ascending by Ralph Vaughan Williams is the piece of music that has come to define the mythical concept of the English countryside, with its babbling brooks and skylarks. Yet, the landscape is not really an unaffected utopia, but a living, working and occasionally rancorous environment that has forged a nation’s musical personality. On a journey that takes us from post-war poets and artists to the free party scene embraced by the acid house and travelling communities, Richard King explores how Britain’s history and identity have been shaped by the mysterious relationship between music and nature.

Additional information

Weight 0.29 kg
Dimensions 19.8 × 12.9 × 2.2 cm
Author

Publisher

Imprint

Cover

Paperback

Pages

vii, 346

Language

English

Edition
Dewey

306.484209410904 (edition:23)

Readership

General – Trade / Code: K

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